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to "washington journal" on this wednesday, march 16, 2011. the latest from japan -- "the new york times" headline -- "second reactor may have ruptured." first, let's start with the war in afghanistan. do you think it is worth fighting? a "the washington post" abc news poll says 2/3 of americans say it is not. the numbers -- we also have a line set up for active duty military. you can also e-mail us and we are on twitter. we will read your tweets on the air this morning. this is the story in "the washington post" yesterday looking at the war in afghanistan. "the afghan war is not worth fighting, most in the u.s. say." host: what do you think? is the war in afghanistan worth fighting? do you think it has been productive so far? if you think this time for a pullout? fairfax, virginia. jack joins us. good morning. caller: good morning. i had a comment about the war and one other comment. i do not think it is worth fighting. we're spending $2 billion per week and countless companies are just taking this money. it cannot be accounted for. that is why i think the republicans are all four wards because t
military? how does it end? >>> then, disaster in the pacific. nuclear nightmare scenario in japan. how prepare sd is united states? could it happen here? libya and japan, two crises with major consequences for the united states. >> as we begin or broadcast, the united states is at war in a third muslim country, libya. we'll take you there live in a moment. abc's team of correspondents is covering every angle of the story. i'll have an exclusive interview with moammar gadhafi's son, saif. i'll be joined here in the studios by chairman mike mullen. >>> but first, the latest headlines in the fast-moving story. a defiant moammar gadhafi is promising a long war, one day after the united states and a broad international coalition launched military strikes on his country. british and american ships and submarines fired 112 cruise missiles on more than 120 targets on the coast. b-2 bombers took out targets. they're plans to impose a no-fly zone to keep him from firing on his own people. sunday, tripoli shook with explosions and ant aircraft fire. libyan state television reported that 48 people
their involvement, allowing for no troops on the ground. the libyan story, japan story, and the budget situation at home. the continuing resolution that punts the decisions on the budget until the beginning of april. they left town this friday morning. we would like to hear which of these stories are most important to you this friday morning. let's begin with a call from san antonio, texas. robert on the independent line. caller: am i on? good morning. i wanted to say that the most significant story i believe is what is happening in the middle east with all of these uprisings and the people wanting democracy. i find it very significant, even though all of these things are happening across the world like japan, i find this very significant because even though america has not intervened with these countries to try to make than democracies, they themselves have tried to make themselves free of dictators and other powers that they did not have control of. host: robert, what do you think of this particular instance with the united nations out suggesting military force is appropriate in libya? caller:
and responsibly. information is still coming in about the events unfolding in japan, but the administration is committed to learning from japan's experience as we work to continue to strengthen america's nuclear industry. >> rose: and then by telephone, ethan brawner of the "new york times" in bahrain. >> it's hard to imagine how they can get back out in the streets quickly. the tanks and the jeeps are out this very important places in great strength. again, on the other hand, bahrain really relies on the financial district and so on to have a normal life, and i think that they're going to have to end the curfew and the marshal law quality at some point. >> rose: we conclude this evening with a look at the continuing crisis in the middle east and north africa with rob malley, john negroponte, and zalmay khalilzad. >> i think what mrs. : clts has done, secretary clinton, has been to hold back on the idea of us stepping forward unilaterally on this but saying, look, if we get the requisite support from the international community, including the arab league, then the predicate has been set for
would not be able to handle a nuclear emergency similar to the events unfoiledding in japan. however, administrator craig fugate told a senate committee yesterday the government as a whole is better prepared to deal with emergencies than it was before hurricane katrina. also testifying, the former inspector general who assessed fema operations since the hurricane. this is about two hours. >> the hearing will come to order. i thank everyone for their patience. as you know we had two votes on the floor. so we delayed the start of the hearing. i welcome, everyone. we convene this hearing which had been long-planned, long-scheduled on fema's ability to respond to a major catastrophe against the compelling backdrop of the tragically catastrophic events unfolding in japan. an earthquake and tsunami in rapid succession that have already resulted in twice as many deaths as al qaeda's attack on america on 9/11. of course no one believes that the death, and finding of the dead is over yet. the earthquake and tsunami have also caused fires and explosions at nuclear power plants that could have
him. so now he is in something -- like crabs coming out of japan, being pulled down by everyone. what is right? what is wrong? president bush was too fast to go into war. they say he is too slow. he is going to take his time to see if he is right and do the right thing by people, not just black people, ever ready. this man loves everybody. you got white people that created this mess and that is coming down on him like he did it. something is wrong with this world. we see things going on and look at it in an abstract way. was notthis war started by president obama. we did not start having money shortage from president obama. he is the first black african american president. you white people sitting around a pole and give your opinion about things. -- around tables and give your opinions about things. you always have done best. this. guehost: our thanks to al- jazeera that is showing us what is going on in libya. from "the new york times", the allies open the air assault on gaddafi forces. residents interviewed. there was heavy fighting and the city center and pro-gaddafi snipers could
their battles? >> we have more on libya coming up about 5 minutes. let's turn our attention to japan or the nuclear and industrial safety agency has announced that the level of radioactive iodine in the sea of japan's fukushima nuclear plant is 3355 times above the legal limit. a state of maximum alert was declared after highly radioactive uranium was found near the plant. we speak to our correspondent in tokyo. levels in the sea are now causing grave concern? >> this is the strongest indication that highly radioactive water that has been discovered within the buildings and outside the buildings he is somehow leaking into the sea. a level of radioactive iodine was detected and considerably higher than any we have been told about so far. almost twice as high. we were told that the measurements taken during the course of yesterday, it was a steadily increasing. it must be said that the nuclear safety agency had stressed that it is a very localized reading taken off the shore of the fukushima plant. they say it will have dissipated and deteriorated considerably by the time that it reach
this morning of some of the aftermath of the tsunami in japan. you can see the flooding and fighters. let me show you a couple of other pictures. this is from china. look at the floating vehicles submerged and the flooded streets in the miyagi region of japan. this is what it was like for people in a bookstore in a japanese city as the ceiling started to fall in the aftermath of the earthquake. big, international story affecting millions of people on the pacific rim and lots of news coverage will be coming out as the death tolls become clear and also the damage. we are going to talk national politics today and we want to move to wisconsin. with the union vote in the assembly, the legislation is now sent to the governor for a signature. a reporter for "the wisconsin state journal" is on the phone with us. tell us about what the mood was like inside the chamber as the legislation passed. guest: hostile. there was about an hour or two of debate yesterday. the republicans called off debate and voted as they filed out of the chamber. their democratic colleagues, along with some protesters shouted
, cnn, atlanta. >>> with the japan nuclear disaster on everyone's mind these days, we want to show you where the united states actually ranks when it comes to alternative energies. stay with us. use magnesium, an ingredient that works more naturally with your colon than stimulant laxatives, for effective relief of constipation without cramps. thanks. [ professor ] good morning students. today, we're gonna... hi. i'm dan hesse, ceo of sprint. the other day, i looked up the word "unlimited" in the dictionary. nowhere in the definition did i see words like... "metering," "overage," or "throttling"... which is code for slowing you down. only sprint gives you true unlimited calling, texting... surfing, tv, and navigation on all phones. why limit yourself? [ male announcer ] sprint. the only national carrier to give you true unlimited. find out more at sprint.com. trouble hearing on the phone? visit sprintrelay.com. introducing the most fuel-efficient luxury car available. the radically new 42 mile per gallon ct hybrid from lexus. welcome to the darker side of green. see your lexus dealer. >
countries? if there is any other country i would move to, it would be japan because they are such a great country. i want to say that we do not need to by our friends via financial aid. this is ridiculous. host: we do not need to by our friends. guest: is a matter of developing or alliances, working together in the interest of the united states of america. in haiti, when there is poverty and people do not have homes or a place to live, it is not a matter of buying our friends but to make sure we can bring stability in the country because they are right on our border. the same thing with mexico. people travel everywhere and we are all interconnected. i hope that in addition to suppor >> in about 20 minutes we will take you live to the white house for a news conference with president obama. among the possible topics, libya and the impact of the sue tsunan the west coast. live coverage when it starts, scheduled now for 12:30 eastern, and can we'll have that here on c-span2. a new member of congress, kevin yoder, a freshman representative from kansas who also sits on the gop's appropriations
this month. usa today has a story about the situation in japan growing and have an impact here in the united states. we will talk about exports and imports and how this plays into japan later on in the program. before our last phone call, i want to show you what colonel gaddafi had to say late yesterday evening about the situation in libya. >> all the muslim armies have to take part in this battle against the crusaders. their protest all over the world to help you come in asia, and africa, in america, in europe. they are people against their own leaders. we will been -- we will win, we will be victorious, we will not surrender. host: an independent in north carolina, your the last phone call. what do you think? caller: thank god for c-span and. i am from south carolina, and only heard it once, our leaders met behind closed doors, which is illegal. i keep hearing about going to cut, going to cut. i walked into my nearby pharmacy and they didn't know and i did not know that my medicaid had been cut. and they were not -- i'm a diabetic with kidney failure, but i could not get my insulin pills o
come back from a trip to japan. we're now here in washington talking as we tape this. you were there to cover another extraordinary story overseas. what i am trying to understand is, why did you make that trip? if you answer me, because it was a great story, that is done enough. you have so many responsibilities that cut into a decision. why you do that? why did you make the trip to japan? >> i wish i could say that it was a science and theory. a lot of it is, i feel compelled to go. it is not his that i covered the tsunami in indonesia or southeast asia, but i felt it was a story i had to experience tangibly. this incredible constellation of disasters -- at that moment, i felt there was a reason for the entire broadcast to be there. part of being an anchor is a decision, where are your best their anchoring? the anchor of a really race. -- relay race. when is the best for you to take the whole broadcasting go overseas? it does change that balance. in the middle east, there were a host of correspondence to rivera and you were fantastic. " -- who were there and who worked fantast
security council. and to add additional at-on sanctions from our partners, including the e.u., japan, and others. when you are trying to sanction iran, no matter how powerful you are and how much we can do, it is imperative that we get the international community to support it. otherwise, there is too much leakage. we have limited that, and i feel strongly that we are making an impact. >> thank you, and i request written responses that you offered to the questions that you are not able to answer because i have so many, including the deposition of the libyan officials, which is so timely. my good friend, the ranking member. >> i want to commend my colleagues on the committee the speech that secretary clinton gave in addition to her estimate -- excellent testimony, but yesterday, going to the human rights council, where she discussed libya, iran, and other issues come up quite a remarkable presentation, particularly in pointing out ypocrisy of ouriran's condemnations of libya. i would like asked -- try to get into issues in this short time. one, the israeli-palestinian process. the que
also non-governmental organizations, look at the regulatory commissions. i think japan is quite a democratic country. it will take awhile to get all the information out of it. in this country, active citizen participation -- go to nuclear regulatory commission hearings. you can comment on all kinds of things. i recently commented on an n.r.c. regulations and rules. it is possible, but i think you have to be vigilant. host: grace writes to us on twitter asking about a ban on nuclear power plants. sharon squassoni, thank you so much for joining us this morning. she is the program director for proliferation prevention at the center for strategic & international studies. let's go now to the floor of the house of representatives, where the session is getting underway. thanks for joining us today. ker. the clerk: the speaker's room, washington, d.c., march 16, 2011. i hereby appoint the honorable renee ellmers to act as speaker pro tempore on this day. signed, john a. boehner, speaker of the house of representatives. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to the order of the house of janua
candidate. he talked about the pentagon budget and japan's nuclear power crisis. this was hosted by the ideal love republican party in davenport. it's 25 minutes. >> thank you very much. congratulations on this. it happened i got to speak at the first state party event at the chairman some of you may remember in july and in 2009 with the rising stars. the great event, read energy, great fun, and i told people at home he is going to be first-rate chairman. i picked up the three, and a former county chairmen. i was the county chairmen in my county twice, once for four years and once for six years and i'm going to just tell you this is where the elections were won. they were here where the rubber meets the road. >> judy, thank you for the work that you do. [applause] >> i would be here on march 15th, but i not going to have anybody to stand behind me. >> i'm really glad to be here for the kickoff the series speaker event because we are getting ready for something very important. the 2012 election is going to be a watershed election in american history. matt didn't go into all of my
friend and ally japan. i spoke with members of the foreign affairs and ministry of justice regarding the fact that japan has become a destination country, a haven for international child abductions. our foreign service officers and consul general were extremely sympathetic. at least 171 children and 131 broken hearted parents are worried sick and have no access to see their children. all of us want japan to sign the hague convention on international child deduction. that treaty will not solve the current cases. they stand at great risk of being left behind a second time. what is the administration's plan to resolve the current cases? on at least five occasions, president obama has met with them. did he raise the issue of those children and their left behind parents? since 1979, brothers and sisters have been illegal in china as part of the bar. one child per couple policy. for over 30 years, the you and public relations -- the u.n. population fund has supported and celebrated the mass of crimes against humanity. the facts are uncontested. any chinese or to that woman without -- or ti
an impression, barbara, about how news of japan sinks into one of the most seismically active country in the world? it's a good question. a lot of my iranian friends have been very afraid about the brashear. -- brashear reactor. i had one friend tell me it's such a hodgepodge of technology. the germans started it in the 1970's and you have chinese bits, russian bits that they're afraid if you plug it in you're afraid the whole thing's beginning to to blow up anyway. now you have japan. it's a very cautionary tale for the iranians. you notice brashear as that -- has not opened. i would bet that it's going to be a while before that reactor starts up if it ever does and if they don't have a functioning nuclear power plant, why do they need all these lower enriched uniform for? -- uranium for? that's in favor as well as all the other problems that's going on, the assassinations of nuclear scientists and so on. it definitely could be a factor in suggesting that they might slow down. i don't think they're going to give up their determination to have a pro
aspiration of the iranians for a long time. do you had the impression, barbara, how news of japan at that didn't one of the most seismically active countries in the world? >> a lot my iranian friends have been wary of the it bashir reactor opening. the german started in the 1970's, and you have chinese and russians, but if you plug it into the whole thing will blow up anyway. and now you have had japan. it is a very cautionary tale for the iranians. bashir has not opened. there were problems with the fuel rods, some say sabotage of the pumps. i think it will be awhile before the reactor starts up, if it ever does. if they do not have a functioning power plant, what did they mine all of the -- in range all the or uranium for? -- what did dave enrich all of the uranium for? it could be a factor in projecting that they might slow down. i do not think they will give up their determination on those who have a program and to say that they have a right to the program. that as a nationalistic issue. they will not go away. >> that is a lesson not just for iran but for the entire middle eas
informed. but there is just so much going on right now, what with japan and libya, the 2012 presidential race that half an hour just isn't enough. even if i leave out all the facts. so tonight, i'm going to cover it all at once. colonel gadhafi announced he's going to travel to iowa to dump sea water on the nuclear reactors which were attacked by france and england in retaliation for the earthquake, which polls show is the most qualified candidate. >> all right. welcome to "morning joe." it is 6:00 on the east coast. too bad we're not there. good morning. it's thursday, march 24th. joe and i are in los angeles again this morning. what time is it here? >> it's 1:15. here in los angeles, elizabeth taylor passed away. they are asking whether elizabeth taylor may have been the biggest movie star ever. of course, america will be remembering her over the next few days. >> she might have been. >> there is for so many reasons, through so many decades she was married to john warner, a senator. but he was number four or five. but also, of course, in the '60s and '70s. most really, most associated
point. you recently come back from a trip to japan. we're now here in washington talking as we tape this. you were there to cover another extraordinary story overseas. what i am trying to understand is, why did you make that trip? if you answer me, because it was a great story, that is done enough. -- a that is not enough. you have so many responsibilities that cut into a decision. it costs a lot to send you and a group of people overseas. why you do that? why did you make the trip to japan? >> i wish i could say that it was a science and theory. to go. it is not his that i covered the tsunami in indonesia or southeast asia, but i felt it was a story i had to experience tangibly. this incredible constellation of disasters -- at that moment, i felt there was a reason for the entire broadcast to be there. part of being an anchor is a decision, where are your best their anchoring? the anchor of a relay race. when is the best for you to take the whole broadcasting go overseas? it does change that balance. in the middle east, there were a host of correspondence who were there and who were fan
blood on his hands. host: thank you. in "usa today" this morning "in japan, nuclear water source is far from clear." host: back to the phones. henderson, kentucky on the line for independents. robert, you are on the "washington journal." caller: good morning. blessed morning to all. host: robert, turn down your television. that will help out a lot. caller: 1 second. i have it right here. host: what do you think about the u.s. involvement and should it involve regime change? caller: as a former moslem, i think it is absolutely disgraceful for the united states of america to be trying to change in regime they are not responsible for. you cannot go around trying to govern the world. the united states is not responsible for the libyan people. they have selected muammar gaddafi as their leader. america has a history of ignoring brutality tyrannical type of behavior around the world. however, when it seems to involve muslims or persons of color, america turns the other cheek. she loves the oil out of libya. she loves to suck the oil out of nigeria. the berlin conference is a historical docume
afghanistan by the end of the year. follow the house live, here on c-span. >> earlier today, japan's prime minister called the damage from the earthquake the most severe challenge the nation has faced since world war ii. friday's disasters damage a series of nuclear reactors, particularly -- potentially sending one to a personal -- a partial meltdown. this statement is about 10 minutes. >> i would like to express my deepest sympathy to those who have been affected by the quake, and also in the disaster stricken areas, as well as to the people of japan who are in a very difficult situation. people remain very calm, and i would like to express my deepest gratitude as well as my respect to all those who are behaving very calmly. boeing yesterday, today we worked very hard to rescue people, and so far, the self- defense force as well as police and firefighters and maritime are able to save about 12,000 people. i would like to explain about the rescue efforts. the self-defense forces, all of the forces have mobilized 50,000 people, and they are to be doubled to 100,000, and the police officers,
on the i live like to do offer my sincere condolences to the people of japan as they recover from one of the first national disasters in their history. japan has been a stalwart partner in afghanistan, an important contributor to the nation there. >> if i could interrupt you for a minute. thank you for doing that. >> thank you. it is the assessment that the momentum achieved by the taller than it since 2005 has been arrested and much of the country and reversed in a number of areas. it is also fragile and reversible. it is clear that much difficult work lies ahead with our partners to solidify and expand our games in the spring offensive. the achievements in 2013 -- in 2010 have allowed the joint nato -- the achievements are also very important. i've prepared to provide recommendations to president obama for commencement of the drawdown of the u.s. search forces in july. it has put us on the right path. afghan forces are in the lead by the end of 2014. bin smmit. the achievements of 2010 and early 2011 have been enabled by a determined effort to get the inputs right united states and
journal" discusses the nuclear situation in japan. the u.s. keeps quiet over radiation, is the headline. the head of the nuclear commission will be our guest on our newsmakers program. you can watch it tomorrow starting at 10:00. he will take questions from reporters concerning what is going on. that program is 10:00 tomorrow morning in the 6:00 tomorrow evening on c-span. he will talk about the latest stemming from what is going on in japan. maryland, republican line. caller: i think we are being hypocrites. we say nothing about israel. them killing innocent palestinian men, women, and children. we give them billions of dollars and ask them to stop building settlements. they tell us to go to hell. i think we are doing a good thing to put more pressure on gaddafi. host: are you comfortable with the level of involvement right now? caller: yes. host: ohio, democrats line. caller: what are we going to do if they knock down some of our pilots? are we going to see water bordering over there? what will we do with collateral damage? i have no idea on how i would answer my own question. i am th
to take resources away from that to help the effort to analyze what happened in japan the decisions on the new reactors are still some time away. right now they're getting public comment. that will take a few months to get all of those comments in. then we will begin the process of reviewing them. that is still several months away. i am not sure exactly how we will balance our resources. mother nature has thrown a hideous tons of the japanese, bigger than their civil a nuclear engineers and licensing authority's anticipated. how can we be confident -- not that we are likely to say tsunami -- how can we be confident that we won't have a hurricane, earthquake and other natural phenomenon that is bigger than the biggest thing you have budgeted for it? guest: the way we think about it is we come up with what we think is the maximum natural phenomenon that we expect to occur and we designed these facilities around that with a little bit extra margin because we now there are some things we don't know. we recognize there may things we had not envisioned or thought about. we have establishe
major contributors. japan for example, provides the salaries for afghan police. there is another fund to which nato-isaf countries contribute, but again it is the afghan secret forces fund that is without question. >> does that 20-24% cut which i believe is in the c.r. and h.r.-1, how does that affect its? >> when that hits, and again, we project that that would hit perhaps sometime in june, that would have an enormous affect, a negative effect on our effort, needless to say. and it would undermine, it would undercut our efforts to develop the enablers. because again, we've always had a progression that first you develop the guys that can help you in the fight, actually out there against the insurgents. and gradually build institutions, the ministries, the branch schools, leader developer courses. by the way, literacy programs have featured very probably now. we finally bit the program -- bit the bullet. with basic training we also do basic literacy now and we're way over 100,000 that have been either train or in the process. >> can you provide a timeline then? getting the independenc
it the largest public debt in japan hit a wall. the japanese debt is about double the size of its $5 trillion economy. it is not a question of whether they are too big to fail. many of the photographs have become part of the picture two weeks after the earthquake and tsunami struck japan. the crisis in japan and the impact on global economics. springfield, ill., back to your calls, republicans only, what issues will define the gop primary next year? good morning. caller: i think the biggest issue is for whoever the candidate or is is for them to espouse conservative values. if they are very conservative in their policy or the programs that they put forth, that will attract a lot of the common americans whether they are democrats or republicans or independents. i think most americans espousing those views. to me, it will be about conservatism and pocketbook issues. it will be about whether or not they feel they are better off than they were four years ago. i don't see that happening. i think there is a malaise and a true conservative candidate will be able to marshal the forces to be elected i
additional sanctions, the european union has additional sanctions, other countries like japan, korea, etc., have added on sanctions, to get some of our partners to follow sanctions that are not u.n. sanctions has been challenging. but we are at it every single day and we will keep it up. there will be more to report to you in the near future. >> thank you for that. i just hope that you can submit for the record how many are under review and what is the 180-day tolling period look like. >> thank you. >> good morning, madame. >> good morning. >> i want to talk with you about the national debt. in is a national issue an regards to national security. how does it affect our ability to affect events around the world? >> i think it is an incredibly important issue. i clearly agree that the united states must be strong at home in order to maintain our strength abroad. at the core of our strength is our economic strength. i am well aware, having sat for you and know sitting for eight years, the necessity to take action to begin to rein in our debt and, particularly, our indebtedness to foreign cou
to make an argument. >> a good point. recently come back from a trip to japan. and we are now here in washington talking as we tape this, but you were there to cover another extraordinary story overseas and you have done a lot of that. what i am trying to understand is, in a way, why did you make that trip? if you answer me, because it was a great story, it is not enough. why do you make the trip? you have seven responsibilities they cut into a decision, because it costs a lot to send you and a lot of people overseas. why did you make the trip to japan? >> i wish i could say it was a science. it's not. a lot of this is i feel impelled to go. it is not just that i covered the tsunami in indonesia and southeast asia, but i felt that that was a story that i had to experience tangibly and to see. and as we said, this incredible constellation of disasters. and i felt at the time, at that moment, too, that there was a reason for the entire broadcast to be there. part of being an anchor is a decision about where are you best there anchoring. isn't it don hewitt and coined the term anchor
to the people of japan, as they work to recover from one of the worst natural disasters in their history. for many years now, japan has been a stall wart partner in afghanistan, an important contributor to the mission there. now our thoughts and our prayers are with our long-time allies and with all those in japan effected by the earthquake and tsunami. >> i can say i believe every person on the committee and every american as well. thank you for doing that. >> thank you, mr. chairman. >> as a bottom line up front, it is isaf's assessment that the momentum achieved by the taliban since 2005 has been arrested inch of the country and reversed in a number of important areas. however, while the security progress achieved over the past year is significant, it is also tragedy i will and reversible. moreover, it is clear that much difficult work lies ahead with our afghan partners to solidify and expand our gains in the face of the expected taliban spring offensive. nonetheless, the hard fought achievements in 2010 and early 2011 have enabled the joint afghan nato transition board to recommend
attention from the historic changes in the middle east and north africa to the tragedy unfolding in japan. as i often say, we have to deal with both the urgent and the important at the same time. with president obama departing for resilience in just a few hours, -- for brazilia and just a few hours, this is the time to consider another important part of the world. the president's trip coincides with the anniversary of a major milestone in hemispheric relations. 50 years ago, president kennedy launched the alliance for progress, pledging that the united states would join with latin american leaders to address head-on a development challenge that was, as he put it, staggering in its dimensions. he understood that our failure to tackle poverty and inequality in latin america could tear the social fabric and undercut democracy's prospects throughout the hemisphere. president kennedy announced the alliance here in washington to an audience of latin american ambassadors at the white house. president obama will mark this anniversary in latin america. i think that is fitting. too few americans ha
sympathy for the people of japan due to the massive earthquake and tsunami. but i was grateful to learn last week at the rotary club that the rotary foundation is taking direct action. special assistant bill walker of the second district office is a dedicated rotarian. the rotary japan and disaster fund has been established for donations online worldwide. the international president of missouri is promoting the people assistance in the best tradition with his creed, building communities, bridging continents. japan is a leading rotary nation and it is fitting the incoming r.i. president nominee to continue the relief assistance of the club of japan. as a rotarian, i appreciate the role worldwide with hundreds of new clubs in formerly communist countries who are making a difference with service above self. as with polio plus, rotarians can achieve humanitarian assistance which creates worldwide records for effectiveness. in conclusion, god bless our troops, we will never forget september 11 and the global war on terrorism. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. the cha
places like helmand province, baghdad, those in japan helping the people recover from >> at a town hall meeting earlier today, president obama said that u.s. involvement in libya would be limited in both time and scope. the president will speak to the nation about libya and washington d.c. later today. we will have that live at 7:30 eastern and take your calls. the senate is back from their spring recess this afternoon. members gavel then to talk about a technology bill. more on that tomorrow on the legislation. also, a u.s. district court judicial nomination a vote on the nomination is expected shortly in the senate. in the house returns tomorrow for legislative and business a bill that would temporarily extend the airport programs. the federal aviation commission programs bill. >> tonight, perspectives on the deal between at&t and t-mobile. and from the communications workers of america and consumers union's discuss the impact on the wireless industry, what the deal faces in the justice department and the potential impact on consumers. >> on saturday, the former u.s. ambassador t
.n. world food program has delivered so far $2 million worth of aid to japan, but the agency said today that japan still needs much more temporary shelter. sanitation help and health equipment. finally, another member of the britain house of commons has been sentenced to prison for making fraudulent expense -- fraudulent expense claims. jim divine has been sent to prison for filing bogus invoices for cleaning and printing work, totaling more than $13,000. a total of three to 92 current and former british legislators have been ordered to pay a total of 1.1 million pounds and expenses. >> you are watching c-span, bringing you politics and public affairs. every morning it is open quote washington journal," our live call-in program about the news of the day. weekdays, watch live coverage of the u.s. house. weeknights coming congressional hearings and policy forums. also, supreme court oral arguments. on the weekend, see our signature programs. on saturday, "the communicator's." on sunday, "newsmakers." you can also watch our program at c-span.org, and it is searchable in our c-span video li
of that decade. one thinks of japan where there was no return of growth until the beginning of this decade. how could you possibly attribute to the government as you do? >> i'm grateful for the honorable gentleman's point we have argued consistently and so has the international community that we had a financial crisis from 2008 and 2009. and out of that crisis without making references to tsunamis and earthquakes there are many after-shocks and it takes much time to actually get over that. so i certainly agree with that point. but it was not us who said that we were going to raise growth in last year. it was the conservative government. and the honorable member from chichester when he pointed out that under a labour government we had 40% debt in relation to gross domestic product. my recollection in some years it was 37%. it was the financial crisis that pushed it up to where it was. >> i'm very grateful from my honorable friend giving way. would he also say that's particularly startling after all the motions we've heard from the chancellor and the budget, the growth forecast is actually after
so many americans dried in europe, korea, vietnam, japan, the middle east? is our government's decision to fight for freedom based on oil, money or principle? >> and jeremiah writes i think the biggest problem in the country is america thinks about the problem of other countries before our own. what will it take for the ruling powers in our own country to put the u.s. first? this nation has enough problems already we need to deal with now. if you want to read more on this, got a lot of e-mail, got to the cnn.com/caffertyfile. >> all right, jack. thank you. jack cafferty with the cafferty file. >>> a hidden camera records controversial remarks by an npr executive. the activist behind it also controversial. we'll have the story next. t wit, i get fast, 24-hour allergy relief. so i feel better by the time we tee off. zyrtec® liquid gels work fast, so i can love the air®. so i feel better by the time we tee off. somewhere in america, a city comes to life. it moves effortlessly, breathes easily. it flows with clean water. it makes its skyline greener and its population healthier
and japan's statistics, they are lower than ours. if any, these are optimistic figures. >> that is exactly right. japan as you probably all know has a birthrate not of 2.0, but more like 1.25. their population, i think, is about in 2005 has been declining even though people are living so much longer. their population is declining and they have essentially no net immigration, so we are still having at least essentially replacement birthrates and having net immigration so good point. our problem is significant, but it's actually worse eel where, so -- elsewhere, so if that's solace, that's real good news. again, if you look at the birthrate at 2.0, add in the net immigration, it makes the equivalent of 2.3. that means while the birthrate dropped from about 3 down to 2 with the help of immigration it's 2.3. it's not quite as bad as just looking at birth rates, but it's still very, very significant. now, the imp nations of all of this -- implications on all of this in social security and beyond social security currently, we can look at what has happened to the relationship between the number o
about the scintillation at japan's failing to nuclear power plant. live coverage from the senate in the tree committee began said 10:00 a.m. eastern. over on c-span3, us senate hearing on protecting the civil rights of muslim americans. witnesses include an official from the justice the apartment. that also stars at 10:00 a.m. eastern. >> experience american history on c-span3. 48 hours of people events telling the american story. here first-person accounts for people who have shaped modern america on "oral histories." history writers and travel to important battle skills and learn about keep figures and events that should be aired during the 100th the 150th anniversary of the civil war. professor spilled into america's past during lectures and history. join curators and the story behind the scene and museum exhibits on american artifacts. the presidency, focusing on policies and legacies, as told to historic speeches and personal insights from administration officials and experts. american history tv on c-span3, all we can, every weekend. get our complete schedule online and sig
, russia, west europe, and japan and turkey. they preface pages xv to 17 spells out the inputs that the task force had. sometimes brilliant background papers in the end of the report, and particularly one just published on women in afghanistan on the perspective of somebody who was under cover trying to maintain women's schools during taliban rule in their country. with background meetings in a dozen capitols, including a meeting with afghan on all sides from senior officials to the kabul government to the political opposition within that political system to civil society to, yes, persons intimately linked to the insurgency. and we at century, my colleague michael hannah and we provided the kind of support that handwriting what was being told to us by the wisdom of those task force members. they set the course and it's to them that we now turn to outline to you our groups recommendations and findings. so tom? >> thank you very much, jeff, for your very kind introduction and for your setting the stage. i begin by saying the reports findings with the wildly varying were unanimous
problems, even to the point of crisis in the next few years. many people have said japan is locked in crisis, that crisis is coming because of the debt that they've accumulated. when that comes to america, do we want to have government by crisis? already we can't even pass a budget. we can't pass appropriations bills. our bills do not even go to the committees anymore. they just come to the floor and we put a patchwork quilt on them and there's a chance this ends up being two more weeks. it is not the way you should run government. if you want to have a significant plan for changing things, send things through the committee. if up to the have a realistic way of running government, have appropriations bills. if you want to be someone who believes in good, responsible government, for goodness sakes, pass a budget. we didn't pass a budget last year. this chart shows how big the problem is. i wish i had a magnifying glass because that's the only way you could see the other side's proposal. $6 billion in cuts. it's one day's borrowing. it's not even one day's spending that they're talki
countries -- japan and brides.rea to importwho import those countries do not have a disparity. what does it mean? i do not know what it means, but i think we have jump to conclusions quite a bit. maybe in the end it will pan out some kind of impact. it is a moral issue, and i think that is why people are attracted to it. we wanted to be a security issue, but i think it may not be at all. >> a gentleman over here, and then we will work down to the front >t. nk you.6nank richard and i have known each other for many years. in that report, youth have become a major factor. we have looked at the current distribution of youth in the muslim majority countries, africa, europe, and the middle east. this is going to increase further to 30% in the next few years. with the exception of few countries, the rates have declined substantially. most of that country's will increase further. i would like to shift from africa to tunisia. 28% of people are youth, a tiny population compared to the region i come from, south asia. in we are about 180 million people in pakistan. that means about 60 million young
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